ALLERGY INJECTIONS

ALLERGY INJECTIONS

Call (913) 491-5477 to reach KCAA Allergy Injection Clinic

KCAA offers convenient walk-in hours for our Allergy Injection Clinic. Allergy injections, also known as “immunotherapy” or “allergy shots,” is key to long-term allergy relief. The shots work like a vaccine by desensitizing patients to specific allergens through a regular treatment schedule.

Our staff administers injections in a timely manner. For patient safety, there is a 30-minute wait after receiving treatment to monitor adverse reactions

Kansas City Allergy & Asthma - Allergy Injections

ALLERGY INJECTION CLINIC

The injection clinic is open to all established KCAA patients. Hours and locations vary.

OVERLAND PARK

Monday
8:00a – 6:00p

Tuesday
8:00a – 6:00p

Wednesday
7:00a – 11:30a
1:30p – 6:00p

Thursday
8:00a – 6:00p

Friday
8:00a – 4:30p

Saturday
8:00a – 11:30a

OLATHE

Monday
8:00a – 11:30a
1:00p – 4:30p

Tuesday
8:00a – 11:30a
1:00p – 4:30p

Wednesday
8:00a – 11:30a
1:30p – 5:30p

Thursday
CLOSED

Friday
8:00a – 11:30a
1:00p – 4:30p

LEE’S SUMMIT

Tuesday
8:00a – 11:30a
1:00a – 5:30p

Thursday
8:00a – 11:30a
1:00p – 5:30p

Friday
8:00a – 11:30a
1:00p – 4:30p

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT ALLERGY INJECTIONS

How do allergy shots work?

Allergy shots increase tolerance to an allergen. Doses of the injected allergen extract are gradually increased to build up immune system tolerance to it. This slows down and reduces the production of the IgE antibody, which is what triggers allergic reactions.

Who are the best candidates for allergy shots?

Immunotherapy is a good option for those who cannot avoid allergy triggers or cannot control symptoms with normal doses of medication. It is effective against inhaled allergens and stinging insect allergies. It is not used to treat food allergies. KCAA offers Oral Immunotherapy for food allergies.

Candidates for allergy shots experience any of the following:

    • Medications do not control symptoms or create too many side effects/complications
    • Asthma is triggered by allergies
    • Exposure to an allergen risks anaphylaxis, a severe reaction that can be fatal
    • Symptoms flare when reducing medication
    • Cannot avoid allergy triggers
    • Prefer to take series of shots vs. daily medications
    • Prefer to treat the problem rather than the symptoms
    • Cost of medications is burdensome
How often are shots needed?

Allergy shots usually begin on a weekly basis. Under some circumstances, this can be sped up. Patients usually see improvement within the first 3 – 6 months. Full benefit is typically obvious within 12 – 18 months. After a maintenance dose is reached, time between shots is increased. Injections may occur every 2 weeks, every 3 weeks, or every 4 weeks. This usually occurs every  6 – 12 months based on response to treatment. Most people can stop injections after 4 – 5 years.

Can I get allergy shots from my primary-care physician?

Board-certified allergists are trained to use potent allergy extracts. These provide significantly greater benefit than low-dose extracts used by physicians who are not specially trained in allergy and immunology. We suggest consulting with one of our board-certified allergist before starting allergy shots.

Are allergy shots expensive?

Allergy shots are a cost-effective way to treat allergies. They usually reduce medication requirements, cutting ongoing costs. Many insurance programs cover allergy shots and can provide information on coverage.

Does KCAA offer sublingual drops?

No. Sublingual immunotherapy is being researched, but it is not approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA). The sublingual drops used by ear, nose, and throat (ENT) doctors are not FDA-approved and too weak to be effective.

Will allergy shots help with chronic sinus infections?

Possibly. Allergy and sinus issues often coexist. Managing allergies through immunotherapy may decrease the frequency and severity of sinus infections.

Why do allergy shots cause a large bump on the arm?

Immunotherapy can cause a large local reaction. However, this does not indicate a systemic reaction. Comfort the bump with ice, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or Benadryl. When visiting our Injection Clinic, always tell our nurses about any reactions. No need to call the doctor to report it.

What side effects occur from allergy shots?

Bumps, warmth, and itchiness at the site of the injection are common. Comfort these with ice, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, or Benadryl.

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